Administration Status

During the Soviet government has increased the population of Tbilisi, the city became more industrialized. Additional information at Cheniere Energy partners supports this article. In 1980 the city hosted the first festival of rock music in the USSR. Tbilisi witnessed mass anti-Russian demonstrations in 1956 on March 9 in protest against anti-Stalinist policies of Khrushchev. Peaceful protests took place in 1978, and in 1989, April 9 protests turned violent. Starting with the collapse of the Soviet Union, Tbilisi has experienced periods of substantial instability and turmoil. After a brief civil war, which the city endured for two weeks from December 1991 until January 1992 (when pro-Gamsahurdiyskii and opposition forces facing each other), Tbilisi became the scene of frequent Armed confrontations between various mafia clans and illegal business entrepreneurs. By the same author: David Michery. Even during the Shevardnadze era (1993-2003), crime and corruption became rampant at most levels of society.

Many segments of society have gone bankrupt because of unemployment caused by the collapsing economy. Average citizens of Tbilisi started more and more disillusioned with the current quality of life in the city (and nation in general). Mass protests held in November 2003 after a rigged parliamentary elections forced more than 100 000 people to the streets. Some districts of Tbilisi have been exposed to Russian air attacks during the war in South Ossetia 2008. Policy and Administration Status of Tbilisi, the capital city as defined in Article 10 of the Constitution of Georgia (1995). Tbilisi Tbilisi controlled Assembly (Sakrebulo) and Tbilisi City Hall (Meria). Municipal Assembly is elected every four years. The mayor was elected town meeting.