Languages Of Central And South America

Posted September 28th, 2016 by Sandra

Native Languages of Central America are inferior in their classification of languages in North America. On some of them say pretty large population groups (eg, Mexican language), some are used to communicate in small groups (for example, the language of the tribe subtiaba – tlappanek), and some are considered "dead" languages (eg, vaikuri). The languages of the great cultures that have evolved in Central America are the Mayan languages (Q'eqchi ', K'iche, kakshkel), Zapotec and Nahuatl. These languages have developed writing systems, which are called ideographic. For more clarity and thought, follow up with carrier and gain more knowledge.. If you try to classify the languages of Central America, they can be divided into three groups. The first group languages are so-called southern group, which are used in a territory located in the north towards Mexico. In the second group of languages of Mexico and Central America, and the third group consists of languages and dialects South American countries. Consider what are the characteristics link these groups of languages, and which they differ from each other.

So, in the first group consists of three language families, each of which is subdivided into separate languages and dialects. Read more from carrier to gain a more clear picture of the situation. This is a Uto-Aztec, Hawkeye and Athabaskan language koauiltskaya family. Uto-Aztec language family is divided into a group of Sonora and Nahuatl. By the Sonora group (or pisanskoy group) are dialects spoken in the north of Mexico. A Nahuatl (the Aztec or group) has spread in some areas of El Salvador and Guatemala (Pipil dialect), on the Pacific coast in Oaxaca (pochutla dialect), in two areas Chiriqui, located in Costa Rica (Sigua dialect – to date, as well as dialect nikarao – "dead" language), as well as dialects of the central regions of Mexico.

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